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What is a stroke, who is at risk and recognising symptoms

random care seemscommon

You have not mentioned in your message anything about your own stroke so please feel free to email on susie.wyart1@gmail.com

BEgood to talk.

Stroke Unit/Hospital

could someone please inform me if stroke nurses have ro specialise in that area when they study? It's just that from my own experiences, they don't seem to understand the devastation a stroke can deliver nor how much a stroke survivor wishes ro get back to rheir old selves. Surely a bit of empathy is not a lor to ask?

I remember,a nurse in a stroke ward, where I was the youngest and only one who couldn't see properly, tell me that I was in C hospital NOT C Hotel. On reflection and feeling more capable now (this was in Oct. 2013) I am cross Ididn't report her to the Matron.....................yes there was a Matron/

Hi random care seems common!!

Hi random care seems common!! Not seen stroke nurse!

They would have general training RGN where they might learn something about strokes! Say might as theory not practice for all depends which wards they do!

Might then do other short courses I guess would need to!

Think whole lacking compassion issue is biggest issue and seems lottery -some excellent care others like me -& you to a point none or poor care.

Sad!!

Take care insist help if needed.

Chris

No I don't think it's a stroke......

I had a similar experience two and a half years back. Definite stroke symptoms, tingling, intermittent numbness, difficulty walking, out of breath, plus seeing stars in my field of vision at times. Went to Doc's told I had Anaemia,cue blood test, - severe iron deficiency anaemia, cue three units of blood, felt fine for one day then, vertigo, pain in head, vomiting, this on a Friday night, spent night with pains in both arms, then left arm went numb, went to A and E on Saturday teatime (husband took me in the car) and, eventually, two days later (our local hospital did not do scans on a Sunday) got ct scan. Informed it was two strokes. Was on an ordinary ward not a stroke ward. Seen very briefly by Stroke nurse who gave me loads of information leaflets I left after four nights with meds. Now on relevant meds. Arm still numb but mostly regained use of it but feels heavy a lot of the time, Never saw a physio. Got an ambulatory 24 hour check six weeks after stroke and that was it apart from occasional blood tests at docs. Anyway still here and still feeling bloody-minded about it all. Never smoked either. Ha!

Hi. Sorry you've had little

Hi. Sorry you've had little care ! My story -registrar decided I wanted be ill missed mri report had 2 strokes -clot and bleed different places!

Now seeing new team next Monday.

Stay determined -it helps I feel!

Insist care if needed though!

Take care of you, rest exercise when you can and no smoking! Never smoked either!! It's not only "cause" !!

Chris

stroke

i am 52 and last sun at 11.30 am a blood clot travelled to my brain and caused a stroke , my family where told i probably wouldn't make it as my pupils had been fixed from leaving home , the doc went in through my groin and grabbed the clot from the base of my brain , and i woke up ,chatting away to the nurse like nothing was wrong then i saw family crying , nurses hugging and doctors shaking their heads , because i really shouldn't have recovered , let alone fully, i can only thank everyone involved for my amazing care as i also have parkinsons(5yrs), i feel it has given me something back and thankfully not taken anything away , i am truly blessed , there is a lot more to this story , this is just the basic info

Wow! That doesn't sound

Wow! That doesn't sound possible

Sounds unusual !

Sounds unusual !

What should I now do?

communication wanted

I am a young 66year old female who had an ischemic stroke in Spain last August. As a result of this, I now have a few problems and I need to talk to someone who has had similar ones which may now have been resolved……………..or not as may be the case. I have Ptosis of both eyes i.e. the eyelids of both eyes do not open unaided ( have found Steristrips to be the most successful way of doing this). I have vision in each eye but double vision if both eyes are open at the same time as I have a bad squint. This is due to 3rd nerve damage,it seems. I also cannot balance to walk due toThalamus damage.PLEASE CAN YOU HELP?

Travel insurance

Hi Iam Graeme 41,

I had bilateral stroke , I have been lucky , my fitness was high before so hopeful

I need some advice or recommendations for holiday insurance

Any help please

Thanks Graeme

New today

Hi. At 51 with complex medical history had two strokes this year

First one missed had every symptom and sign the hospital said not a stroke!! Second one a bleed.

Doing well considering no treatment or care and millions healthcare errors.

Exhausted, bit emotional week discovering it was two strokes!!

Hope right place to say hello. Not really clear for me right now.

Thankfully determination will help me push forward somehow.

Chris

Hi Chris

Hi Chris

I have just read your post and wanted to reply.
My mum has had 2 strokes, one in 2010 and one a few months ago.
She is also young like you, a 54.
This seems to be the right place to say hello, I just registed today, more so to see what help I can get for my mum.
I know she struggles and doesnt tell me the half of it but I know.
Determination is the one thing you must keep.
Read peoples posts on here and talk about it as much as you want.
Im glad there is a place like this for people to come and talk.
I have sent my mum the link in the hope she will come on tooand have a browse to realise she isnt on her own.
xx

Thanks. See another

Thanks. See another consultant Monday results last scan etc then! Trying hard. Hope mum -your mum doing ok.
Chris

hello

hi chris and glad to hear your doing reasonably well! I know where your at,i think! had a/f for four years then a stroke in april this year and still im mystified by it all. as for health care....had stoke on Friday,hospital,then chucked out first thing Monday!! still seeing a neuro therapist and physios and next week off to orthotics to get my foot working again. I too get tired still,so my advice to is when your tired,whenever or what ever the time is,sleep. its the brains way of healing itself,thats what im told anyway.
be strong,its a long road but you will get there
simon

Hi Simon, thanks. See new

Hi Simon, thanks. See new consultant Monday afternoon! Had recent mri see changes etc if any since strokes. Been nightmare first consultant team rather useless admitted their errors!
Yes I'm learning ways cope and slow progress better none!!

Take one day at time.

Chris

HI SIMON

Hi Simon

I just read your post to Chris and thought how hoenst and lovely it was.
You are so right in the fact they seem to treat you then sort of leave you to it.
My mum has had 2 strokes, one in 2010 and one a few months ago.
She is also young like you, a 54.
This seems to be the right place to say hello, I just registed today, more so to see what help I can get for my mum.
I know she struggles and doesnt tell me the half of it but I know.
Determination is the one thing you must keep.
I think people tend to think that they should get better quicker than they do, forgetting that its a stroke and how major they are to you.
As you say, its a long road but you will get there.
I am glad there are people like you on here for other stroke survivors to talk to. x

Back pain is a common disease affecting millions of people

Back pain is a common disease affecting millions of people each year. The lower part of the buttocks to the back pain relief of the upper spine, total muscle disorder that affects the lower back. This is one of the most common causes of lost work and in every age, race or gender does not affect anyone. This is one of the top 10 reasons patients seek medical attention low back pain.

Feeling down

I know its stupid cos I have physically returned to near normal within only 6 weeks but I feel so depressed, I find no joy in anything, I cry over nothing and constantly expect to just drop down dead any second. Can anyone relate / give advice? Thanks x

Feeling down

I had my stroke nearly 3 years ago and still have my bad day were I just want to give up and stop fighting but thankfully as time goes on I'm having more and more good days. Speck to your doctor and see if you can get some counseling it good to talk about what happens. Don't be scared to ask question to put your mind at rest.

About the crying I still cry at anything my emotions are up the left. I cry when others are happy, & laugh when someone dies, just let people know that this will happen.

Hope this helps

second bleed

Hi I'm not sure if this is the right place to post but I need some advice. My 63 year old mum had a major stroke 4.5 months ago. It was a bleed and affected her right side and speech mainly with some memory and spacial awareness issues, fatigue and incontinence. Well after 4 months in hospital/rehab she has recovered incredibly. Regaining continence, speech and cognitive skills and gaining some hand and arm movement and walking with a frame. She walked out of hospital. However yesterday her speech went again so we took her to hospital and it seems she has a small bleed in the same place as before. Her speech has gone, she is incontinent again and very confused. We are hoping it's just a set back but am wondering if anyone else has had experience of this and knows what the likely outcomes might be. As with the initial stroke drs are reluctant to predict anything so we are in that uncertain position again! We are so upset after she's done so well and been so determined and positive.

communication wanted

I am a young 66year old female who had an ischemic stroke in Spain last August. As a result of this, I now have a few problems and I need to talk to someone who has had similar ones which may now have been resolved……………..or not as may be the case. I have Ptosis of both eyes i.e. the eyelids of both eyes do not open unaided ( have found Steristrips to be the most successful way of doing this). I have vision in each eye but double vision if both eyes are open at the same time as I have a bad squint. This is due to 3rd nerve damage,it seems. I also cannot balance to walk due toThalamus damage.PLEASE CAN YOU HELP?

Hi sorry tough time. Had 2

Hi sorry tough time. Had 2 strokes this year one clot then bleed both ignored by drs and only now proven on scan so no care , physio speech etc.
I knew, friends knew ,drs said not sure what's wrong, scanned only half brain missed it......disastrous care.

Not sure ways suggest help. Do eye drs have ideas? Physio helping balance?
I joined a small local gym because no diagnosis no help. Fantastic personal trainer has helped me ways dealing with balance. Been twice week for month and differences amazing worth every penny. Since knowing diagnosis makes sense things find very hard. Others there working hard really supportive when I crawl in dragging leg when tired etc. Think extreme hard work with caution not overdo is only way. Get right help physio,gym, etc.

Chat soon.

Chris

Exhaustion

My stroke,12 months ago,has left me with constant,overwhelming, exhaustion.
My GP, together with my stroke consultant, have prescribed Mirtazapine and Amantadine with no success. They are considering Modafinil.
Does anyone have experience of using this drug and, if so did it help ?
Any information about help in overcoming this continuing tiredness would be appreciated.

selling a stroke adapted car

Hello all

My late father was a stroke sufferer who sadly has now passed.
I am trying to sell his car which has a 9 way lodgesons adaptation suitable for anyone with a single arm disability.

I would really like it to be made use of - rather than selling it to someone who wont use the adaptation.

I know how much it meant to my Dad when he got the car adapted - it gave him back his freedom and cheered him up greatly.
does anybody know of anywhere I can advertise the car where it would be visible to people with similar mobility issues.
I didn't want to post it on here as an advert as I thought that would be wrong.
I'd really appreciate any advice or pointers .
kind regards
James

post stroke 7 months

I would like some information regarding social activities around Bingley and Bradford for my Husband who had a stroke last October.
Can anyone help please?

Hi have you tried help line?

Hi have you tried help line? What about local library for local things going on?

Chris

Hi, I'm new here I have been

Hi, I'm new here I have been living with the aftermath of a huge stroke for 20 years. I was only 4 when I had it. It was caused by a bloodclot on the left hand side of my brain so my right side of my body is affected I was wondering if there are any other people who have had a stroke very young on here

Hi, I didn't have a stroke as

Hi, I didn't have a stroke as young as you, but had a brain stem stroke back in 2011 when I was 21.

new to stroke

I wanted to post a reply to "new to stroke" but I cant find the original post. I too had a stroke on 3 May 2014 and fall into the otherwise-healthy, youthful 61 year old category. I consider myself lucky in that my speech, though slow ,is now understandable and I can walk slowly- sometimes with a stick, I can climb stairs, and I live independently.
However, fast though my improvement has been, this has meant that the community support (OT, physio, speech therapist) have all 'left me to my own devices' because I have been progressing so well. I am not driving and I live in a remote hamlet. I put on a brave face and everyone thinks I am doing marvellously and so, 10 weeks on, it is assumed that determination will see me through... but I am not doing my hand exercises; my only exercise is walking round the house or vacuuming (rarely), and I am concerned that I have reached a point where I don't really believe that I can improve further, but I wouldn't dream of appearing to others as anything other than positive and motivated. I also worry about my daughter, who has been amazing, but she's also juggling a job and a young family. I seem to be surrounded by sympathetic folks but what support is there for her, other than me pretending I am fine ? Neither of us wants sympathy, we just want me back to 100% and I think she feels guilty that she 'leaves me to get on with it'... but I'm stubbornly independent. Should I ask for more community support instead of a visit once every 2 weeks which has now ended? I worry that I haven't got the motivation which everyone thinks I have.

Motivation

Hello,
Motivation and brave faces seem to me to be things that come and go, sometimes I find it easy to be motivated and positive and other times the thought of another 40 years of life as it is makes me want to take a very long walk off a very short cliff. I guess we're normal in this and I'm sure if analysed there would be reasons for our ups and downs. It sometimes takes me a while but I can usually identify the reason for my 'downs' - they are often outside of (but semi linked to) my husbands stroke. I am not naive enough to think that if it wasn't for my husbands stroke all would be rosey and I'd never get down, but the stroke does seem to have created many problems!

NHS therapy does seem to vary across the country, I'm not sure there's a theme but in Lincolnshire it seems to be that they discharge you when they think there's no more progress they can make with you. In the case of Speech Therapy my husband has proven them wrong - I would love to take him back to see them! But, except for going private (or getting involved in research) we have to make the best when therapy finishes, continuing with exercises, trying new things, even asking for referrals if things change.

Living rurally and not driving must be really tough. In Lincolnshire we have a service called CallConnect which is a semi regular bus service that you book to pick you up from your house when it's in the area. You could investigate if there's one local to you. Alternatively, you could be completely honest with your fellow villagers, perhaps print off some notes that tell people you've had a stroke, you're adjusting to your new capabilities but struggling with not getting out, could people let you know if they're going anywhere so you could get a lift. People are often pleased to be able to help.

Have you any contact with your local Stroke Association lady/man? Apart from being a great person to offer support they are a wealth of local information. When I filled in my Stroke Association Volunteer application form one of the 'jobs' was driving - there maybe a driving volunteer who'd happily pick you up and take you to a local stroke club for company, giving and getting advice and doing your exercises!

Now, your daughter. It took me a really long time (and perhaps a blunt pointing out) that when people offer help they mean it, they want to help and it's as much for their own therapy as for yours. We don't like being out of control and we don't like not being involved in something we care about. Obviously it's brilliant that you're so independent so your daughter doesn't have lots of jobs to do for you as well as your own but she'll still worry - especially if she doesn't feel that she knows what's going on in your head. My husband recently took part in some research to see if Solution Focused Brief Therapy was possible for people with aphasia. It's a brilliant, life coaching type of therapy that you and your daughter could do a version of, over a cup of tea and a chat once a week. The idea is that you come up with ten things each week that mean your life is going in the right direction, so if you've been doing your exercises once a week then twice is an improvement, if you've walked round the block without your stick that could go on, anything that is an achievement for now (not pre stroke) no matter how tiny. We found it a really nice way to identify and celebrate success, and by doing so we were motivated and encouraged. Your daughter could even make a list of things that she feels are going well for you and you could compare. I think this is quite a structured way of doing something that very positive people do naturally - I'm hoping that if we do it long enough it will become natural for us!

You seem worried that your daughter isn't being supported, she's perhaps finding support in all the parts of her life that haven't changed, her colleagues at work may be supporting her or her friends outside of work, even Mum's at the school gate. I remember one morning going into the village papershop (where our kids have all had paper rounds) and the lady saying 'how are YOU' - I just burst into tears and ended up with a long chat and a cuddle, it's amazing where you can find support when you're not confined to the house. You could tell her/show her this forum if she wants some more stroke specific support or she could call the local stroke association - they support anyone touched by stroke, family included.

I think maybe you and your daughter are both worrying about each other - perhaps a cup of tea and a cuddle mixed with a bit of honesty might put both your minds at rest!

I am going to use your words now - after your 'fast improvement' for the first 10 weeks it may have slowed down considerably but so many people we hear from seem to continue making small progresses for years to come - my husband is still improving two and a half years on, he doesn't see it though! Don't think that you can't improve when so many others do!

The other thing that has occurred to me is that it took me about nine or ten months to actually realise the implications of my hubby's stroke and for it all to sink in - that was when my motivation and brave face started to wobble, I wonder if you've hit that part now and that's causing your feelings. We went to the UK Stroke Assembly last month and there was a really interesting workshop by Relate where they talked about the feelings people commonly experience after stroke - the slides aren't on the website yet but hopefully they will be soon - if you could identify where you are on the 'cycle' you might be encouraged by how normal you are or reassured by all your feelings being there in black and white.

What many, many people forget (or don't realise) is that stroke is a major, life changing occurrence. It takes from you more than just speech or mobility or understanding, it takes some security from your future, it takes many of your activities in the present. It can take a lot of hard work to both overcome disabilities and be in a position to look forward to the future. This hard work is exhausting and it's no wonder that many stroke survivors do struggle with depression. Don't be hard on yourself, it sounds like you're doing brilliantly and the fact that you've identified that you're having a wobble is very positive as you've done something about it! I bet you felt better just writing your post......

Let us know how you're getting on - it's really interesting to hear from people who've found some kind of solution.....

Take care

Paula

Motivation and 'new to stroke;

Hi Paula, Thank you so much for reading my post and for responding so fully. It is really appreciated and I shall show my daughter tomorrow. Some great tips there. if there is a good side to stroke it is the opportunity it can give to show those you love just how much you treasure them. I hope your husband continues to improve and that you receive support too. I have noted your comments well and it is heartening. I owe it to my daughter, and to you too, to stay positive... and I will. My very best wishes to you and yours for the future... Annette

new to stroke

I wanted to post a reply to "new to stroke" but I cant find the original post. I too had a stroke on 3 May 2014 and fall into the otherwise-healthy, youthful 61 year old category. I consider myself lucky in that my speech, though slow ,is now understandable and I can walk slowly- sometimes with a stick, I can climb stairs, and I live independently.
However, fast though my improvement has been, this has meant that the community support (OT, physio, speech therapist) have all 'left me to my own devices' because I have been progressing so well. I am not driving and I live in a remote hamlet. I put on a brave face and everyone thinks I am doing marvellously and so, 10 weeks on, it is assumed that determination will see me through... but I am not doing my hand exercises; my only exercise is walking round the house or vacuuming (rarely), and I am concerned that I have reached a point where I don't really believe that I can improve further, but I wouldn't dream of appearing to others as anything other than positive and motivated. I also worry about my daughter, who has been amazing, but she's also juggling a job and a young family. I seem to be surrounded by sympathetic folks but what support is there for her, other than me pretending I am fine ? Neither of us wants sympathy, we just want me back to 100% and I think she feels guilty that she 'leaves me to get on with it'... but I'm stubbornly independent. Should I ask for more community support instead of a visit once every 2 weeks which has now ended? I worry that I haven't got the motivation which everyone thinks I have.

Muscle Pain

I had a stroke in March, aged 52, and otherwise fit and healthy.

I was got to a hospital fast, fortunately, so I've recovered very well so far: I have regained movement, swallowing, etc.

In the past six weeks or so, though, I've started to feel stiffness in muscles (shoulders, back), and about three weeks ago my consultant said it was due to the statins (Astorvastatin), and cut the dose.

This doesn't seem to have made any difference.

Is it usual for statins to cause stiffness weeks after starting to take them? Has anyone had success with co-enzyme Q10? There are mixed reviews about whether this helps or not, but I have started taking them.

Any information would be gratefully received, thanks.

Hi My mom also suffered a

Hi
My mom also suffered a stroke some 3 months back.Her right limbs got paralytic. Few days after she felt intense pain in her right shoulder. Physio minimized the shoulder exercise. And after 1.5 months her hand started swelling. Her pain also increased . After consulting doctors they said since the movement of shoulder muscle is almost nill she is having stiffness.
So physio started the shoulder exercise. And I tell you how much she cried when he does the exercise. She felt intense pain.
But after a week the stiffness is very low. Even the improvement in her hand is very much as compared to initial days.
Due to shoulder stiffness many of her lower hand muscles also get stiff.
So its better to keep moving your hands after some time. Or if you can do it yourself take some one's help.

post stroke fatigue

Hi all . I'm new here and struggling with all kinds of issues . My husband had a mild stroke in march . He's 47 . Basically he is recovering but I find he is really really tired most days and even though his blood pressure is controlled and his diabetes is controlled now ,most days he says he feels unwell. It seems to me he is getting worse and not better ...or maybe its just me ,? Is this extreme fatigue being experienced by anyone else ? Is it common? I also find he is not quite the same person he used to be .

Hi Jayne, Yes, I'm fatigued

Hi Jayne,
Yes, I'm fatigued almost as soon as I wake in the morning, although 10 weeks after my stroke I don't have to lie down every day any more... but I do sit down a lot!! And doing ANYTHING can make me very tired. Good luck, I hope progress continues and I suggest if he wants to lie down then you do as well !!

Normal

I had a stroke nearly 3 years ago and it normal to feel tried all the time. Its only 3/4 months since he had his stroke it was about 18 months before I could last a whole day without lying down. Check out link below gives some useful info. http://www.stroke.org.uk/sites/default/files/F09_Stroke%20in%20people%20...

Thankyou for your reply ! I

Thankyou for your reply ! I hope you are doing well now x

Just want to download

Hi all, my father has had a haemorrhagic stroke. After having it he has been quite lucid despite the bleed being described as significant, however in the last couple of days he has stopped talking to us and has become very distant. He has also stopped feeding himself and shows no interest in doing it for himself. The doctor says there is no sign of further bleeding or any urinary infection (he has a catheter) however his sodium levels were low last week and have lifted slightly but are still below what they should be.

Recent Family member - Massive Stroke.

Hi, I am new to this so I do not really know what is the norm but here goes. Monday 30th June at 8:05am my Aunty (aged 42) had a stroke. Her initial symptoms were diziness and extreme fatigue. She went into the living room where her daughter (15) helped her onto the sofa as she was saying 'I will be fine after a little nap'. 11am I recieved a call saying she had been rushed into the Acute stroke uni at LGI and that is where she remains now. We have had some what mixed messages from the healthcare professionals, however from what I can understand, it is not a very good situation at all. I am trying to remain positive and strong for the rest of the family as you need to be in times like this but I am finding it extremely difficult. She has brain damage to the right hand side of her brain therefore effects on the left hand side of her body. Since being admitted to hospital she has mainly been drowsy and drifting in and out of consciousness/sleep. She has had some scans and basically we have been told that she does have brain damage and will have some form of disability if she recovers from the stroke, however we have been plainly told that she is on a 50/50% road now. They were planning to do an operation whereby they would remove part of her cranium to relieve the swelling of the bleed on the brain but I believe that they are holding off on the op as the scans showed no progression of swelling but no reduction either. I am just wondering if anyone has had/knows of any similar experiences and what the path ahead was/is like. I am quite a positive person usually but in extreme cases like this I cannot help being slightly pessimistic. The docs have managed to get a liquid feed via a tube through her mouth and nose and she has been speaking a few words to her partner but not proper sentences. I read that drowsiness afterwards can be a really bad sign. I'd like people to be honest, and not sugar coat the facts.

I am just so worried and anxious and the days are so long - it is just one big waiting game and I would just like to hear from someone who understands how it feels.
Kindly,
Robyn Atkinson

Your Aunty

Dear Robyn,
My Husband had exactly the same thing last October, he too was in the LGI however he had the brain operation to remove the swelling and eventually returned home early January. Its a long slow recovery aided by some wonderful professionals so take heart.
Tiredness is normal, it takes ages honestly and its hard at times, we are proof of the success, we were at one stage given no hope at all ( two days following the stroke) LGI saved my Husbands life basically.
You do get very tired and very anxious and any progress initially is tiny, its a horrid situation for a few weeks, I do remember it well.

Life is not easy now at home but its far better than the bleak alternative initially offered.

I hope this helps you a little.

A bit of hope

Hi Robyn, sorry to hear about your Aunty. I wanted to sure a bit of hope with you, I myself had a stroke in 2011 and was in a really bad way, there was only a 1% of me living. The Doctor has to tell to you the worse outcome. It good that she saying some words even through they don't make since, I didn't say my first word till 3.5 months after stroke. Keep in there your aunty will need all the support she can get.

MECHANICAL CLOT RETRIEVAL FOR STROKE

Hello, I am conducting research into the experimental procedure commonly known mechanical clot retrieval for stroke. (It is also known as mechanical embolectomy or intra arterial thrombectomy.) Have you or a friend or relative ever had a surgical procedure where an attempt was made to remove an acute ischemic clot from your brain via a surgical procedure, as opposed to being given a clot busting drug, or after a clot busting drug was administered but did not work? I would like to hear of your experience, whether first or second hand. Kindest regards and thanks in advance.

Worried

Hi I am completely new to this. I have never been part of a forum and have never needed to ask for advice regarding any medical issues.

My 14 year old son had a stroke on Thursday 19th June 2014. We rushed him through to the hospital as he was convulsing , they did an immediate Ct scan which showed clear. He woke up on the Friday and had lost all sensation on the right hand side of his body, slurred speech, memory problems. They then did an MRI which showed that he had had a minor stroke on the left hand side of his brain.

They say he had a Minor stroke on the left hand side of the brain. Which has affected the right side of his body, speech, memory. They saying he won't recover 100% but 98% - he has improved everyday and was doing so incredibly well. Sensation was returning, he could walk with a slight limp, arm was still a bit of a problem , speech was returning, smile was almost back to normal. He is a very healthy child, very sporty and we have no family illness and all tend to live to a very ripe old age. We have been very blessed as a family and I am extremely grateful for his

They have In the meantime done hundreds of blood tests, scans etc. everything is coming back clear. He has started various therapies, such as OT, Bio, Physio, Speech etc. they all saying his recovery so far has been remarkable. As he was showing vast improvement.

On Saturday 28th June he sort of had a relapse, not a stroke but has lost all sensation on the right hand side of his body. It came back for about 30 minutes and then went away again. He went to sleep and woke up this morning sensation had returned to his leg. But sensation has gone again, but is now affecting his face and speech.

Can someone tell me if this is normal? Are there other tests I can ask them to do? I feel so helpless,

So sorry to hear about your

So sorry to hear about your son, On the day of my stroke I had feeling coming and going. Movement comes and go but don't know about sensation have a word with Doctors.

It could be years before they find out what happened as I'm still waiting nearly 3 years.

help please

hi , my 49 yr old brother had a major stroke yesterday and i just dont know what to do , he is so helpless most of his right side is not working he cant talk and has a problem swallowing , will he improve ? its horrible to see him like this he cant even write anything down and i feel so bad as i dont know what he wants he is trying to get things across but i cannot grasp much that he means . me and my mam just do not know what is going to happen with him

Patience

My great auntie who is 90 had a stroke last year and was the same, she found it frustrating as we did, but she improved daily, you actually start to understand after a little while, just listen and try not to jump in and speak for him, she said she found that more frustrating than struggling to find the words herself as she said she found it threw her train of thought. I feel for you, it's horrible seeing someone you love so helpless and not be able to make it better. Just try and be patient, he will improve daily. Slowly but my aunt was back to normal within a month, and that was down to the hospital and my dad recognising that she had had a stroke and calling an ambulance straight away. A year on you would never know she had a stroke. I had a mini stroke two weeks ago and physically I am fine, but my head is every where and I find it frustrating because I look fine but find it very hard to concentrate and my short term memory is gone, I sometimes struggle to say words which is really annoying as I can see and hear it in my head but I can't get my mouth to say it and it turns conversations into a game of charades as people keep jumping in and trying to guess what I'm saying. Which makes me annoyed! Lol x

Thinking of you

Hope your brother is still making good progress. My partner who is 55 had his stroke on 31st may 2014. He could not move his right side, speak, swallow and worse of all did not know who I was. But, nearly four weeks on he is now finally back on normal foods and the his speech is improving day by day. I saw him take his first steps last week which blew me away. Obviously with the help of a physio team. But, still amazing to see. He is on some very strong muscle relaxant tablets which whilst making him very drowsy seem to be helping him get movement back in his leg and arm. Stay strong even though it's very hard. We have an eight year old girl which was heart broken when she saw her daddy for the first time. But now she visits him every night. We play card games, do writing exercises, practise his facial exercises with him. Some how try to make light of a very upsetting and challenging situation. Over the past few weeks I have realised keeping his spirits up and not letting him get down has really helped his rehab. I have also been allowed to go to one of his five rehab sessions each week, which has helped me see the progress he is making. Every day it breaks my heart to see him like it. But to see where he has come in just a few weeks is amazing. I never thought he would be where he is now to how he was the day he had is stroke. Somedays he still can't remember my name and still gets very confused. But we just make a joke of it now when it happens. Hopefully over the next few weeks your brother will start to have little miracles happen also. Xxx

So Scary

Hello Kennyboy,
Bless you and your Mum - and your brother of course - it's so hard to get your head round isn't it.
We can't tell you if he'll improve, which is frustrating, but there's just not the understanding there, science doesn't have that knowledge yet. What we can tell you on TalkStroke is our stories, hopefully you can be encouraged by them, while understanding the huge task that could be in front of you.
Your brother sounds very much like where my husband was at two and a half years ago. The important thing for your brother right now is that he's on a specialist stroke ward and he's getting as much rehab (Physio, Speech and Language, Occupational Therapy) that he can benefit from. You can help by sitting in on some sessions to learn some exercises and repeating them as much as possible through visiting times.
I'm not sure it will help you to know what my husband could do when, as it probably will have no likeness to your brothers recovery. But I can tell you that being in hospital was just the beginning, we have had much recovery since he came home (at seven weeks). For the first six weeks at home Assisted Discharge therapists came to our house for rehab every day, this is really important to keep up the exercises - and to keep changing them as progress is made. BUT even though therapists came to the house each day we still did hours of exercises on our own each day, just repeating them as often as possible.
After assisted discharge we were handed to outpatients where progress continued - it is possible to make progress months and years later so don't give up - Speech Therapy ended about nine months post stroke, which was really scary as we weren't getting much speech at all, but since then there has been massive progress, partly due to time, partly due to massive effort and partly due to some extra therapy in research programmes. We still go to physio now to perfect walking, in order to be able to walk on all surfaces without needing any assistance. Unfortunately the arm still does nothing, but we still try to keep it in good shape and remind it that it has a purpose.
All that may or may not be interesting to you, but perhaps right now is more important. Does your brother have a picture chart? If not you can get one at...
http://www.speakability.org.uk/OneStopCMS/Core/TemplateHandler.aspx?NRMO...
(this organisation also does workshops to help carers learn to communicate with their stroke survivors)
When my husband was obviously trying to tell me something I would hold things within reach (wee bottle, drink, bed controls, tv remote, blanket) and he would bat them away with his good hand, or sometimes I could tell by his expression if it was the right guess. I rarely got it right first time, but at least he wasn't wetting himself with this method!
A note book is a really good idea, your brother may be able to draw things you can understand. Just because he can't write anything today doesn't mean he won't be able to tomorrow so make sure he has the tools and get him to doodle, copy you, anything to get his brain working.
It can also be really useful when you're talking to your brother to write down key words, draw diagrams or list peoples names - once it's written down your brother can ponder over it and if he wants any of it repeating he can simply point to the right bit of page. Even now sometimes I have to do this for my husband to understand complicated things (I was doing a family tree on a napkin at a funeral this week!).
I know that it's heart-breaking, it's frustrating and it's so tiring, but I believe it's worth effort as even if the actual speech doesn't come back very quickly you and your brother can get better at communicating so he can be understood. There are techniques you can learn and you will make up your own.
You might find you need to ask closed questions if your brother can yes/no or nod/shake head or thumb up/down. There's also a technique called Forced Alternatives where your left hand is tea and your right hand is coffee - you hold your hands up saying tea (raise left hand) or coffee (raise right hand) then your brother would touch the one he wanted - just repeat it back to him though to double check.
Visiting times can be really painful as onesided conversation is not easy to keep up for weeks on end, so as well as some therapy exercises we used to play games, connect 4 is a good one as it gets a stroke survivor using the whole field of vision. I also used to borrow jigsaws from all my friends with little children, getting progressively more difficult, my hubby seemed to be motivated by my leaving a jigsaw at the end of afternoon visiting and coming back to it finished in the evening.
We used to sing as well, started with nursery rhymes and football terrace songs and then I brought in his guitar/song book so we had some words. Has your brother tried singing - I am still amazed how well some people can sing when they cannot speak a word. It's got to be good for the mouth all that moving around, and to keep the voicebox working and for a bit of spirit raising.
Are there some children in your family? They are refreshing as they have no fear or prejudice, they accept what they see. My husband also tried things for our kids that he might give me a funny look over, some of the kids turn therapy into games and try having him dance or play word games.
I hope I've helped a little, both with some techniques for now and some understanding of how some people recover. I've not mentioned that it really is early days, (they last for weeks/months) so there is lots of potential for recovery. But there's also the potential for a long, tough, time ahead so look after yourself and Mum too. Make sure you eat, exercise and have a bit of time for yourselves too - your brothers going to need you all strong, positive and tireless!
Take care, let us know how you get on
Paula
x

thanks paula

hi paula and thanks so much for your reply and suggestions it helps a lot , i was at the hospital again today and he is showing some signs of improvement !!! , he is a bit mor mobile today and i understood him a few times he has def improved since wednesday but they have put a feeding tube in . even such little signs have helped me and my mam feel a little better . we even got a chuckle out of him so his sense of humor is getting better too x