Can we predict how people with aphasia after stroke will respond to speech and language therapy?

University College London
Status
Active
Summary

The recovery of stroke survivors with language difficulties is famously variable. Some stroke survivors recover much more quickly or fully than others. Some respond to treatment much better than others. The aim of the proposed work is to employ similar techniques to PLORAS project to predict which patients are most suited to what speech and language therapy, which could then help them make their best recovery.

Date published
01/08/2017

Can we develop a new language treatment to improve everyday talking for people with aphasia?

City, University of London
Status
Active
Summary

Although speech and language therapists (SLTs) may help aphasia patients with their rehabilitation, there remains a clear lack of evidence-based treatments available for them to help their patients with problems of everyday talking, known as ‘discourse’.  This study aims to address both the need for evidence-based treatments and improvement of clinical expertise to address discourse problems after stroke.

Date published
25/01/2018

Can we improve predictions of upper limb recovery after stroke with brain imaging?

University College London
Status
Active
Summary

Stroke survivors and their relatives consistently ask for information about how much recovery can be expected. This study will look at how well a patient can use their arm after stroke, and at their brain images recorded within 72-hours after stroke. The hope is that brain images can improve our prediction of patient arm movement recovery at six months after stroke.

Date published
01/02/2018

Can a filter device protect the brain during stenting in the chest and reduce risk of stroke and brain injury?

Imperial College London
Status
Active
Summary

Disease of the chest portion of the largest artery in the body (the aorta), is known as thoracic aortic disease (TAD). The number of people experiencing TAD is increasing. This study is investigating how to make thoracic endovascular aortic stenting (TEVAR), the preferred method of treating TAD, safer by using extra protection devices.

Date published
20/11/2016

Delivering group support for people with aphasia through Eva Park

City University, London
Status
Active
Summary

About one third of stroke survivors are left with aphasia. This is a language disorder that disrupts the production and comprehension of speech, as well as reading and writing. This study will investigate whether a support group intervention can be delivered remotely to people with aphasia through a virtual island platform called Eva Park.

Date published
19/11/2016

Can we adapt a social participation and mood therapy to help those with language difficulties after stroke?

City University London
Summary

This study will explore whether an existing therapy, Solution Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT), can be used for people with aphasia. Information will also be collected to design a future large-scale trial evaluating this approach.

Date published
18/09/2016

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