Can we use computer tests and therapy in the homes of stroke survivors with spatial neglect?

University of East Anglia
Status
Active
Summary

Spatial neglect is caused when damage to the brain after stroke means that it no longer received information about one side of the body and/or world. Stroke survivors with spatial neglect might not be aware of anything happening on one side of their body. This research will investigate a computer based version of a new treatment for spatial neglect after stroke.

Date published
29/04/2019

Measuring and exploring the impact on vision-related quality of life for stroke survivors with post-stroke visual problems

University of Liverpool
Status
Active
Summary

This research will test a new questionnaire which has been designed to measure the impact that stroke-related vision problems have on a stroke survivor’s quality of life.

Date published
29/04/2019

Can earlier orthotic assessment and provision of lower limb splints lead to improved mobility and reduced complications for patients after a stroke?

University of Nottingham
Status
Active
Summary

This research will investigate the use of orthitics (for example, braces and splints) early on in a stroke survivor’s rehabilitation. The results will inform a larger study into early orthotic use after stroke.

Date published
29/04/2019

Can we treat common causes of shoulder pain after stroke?

University College London
Status
Active
Summary

Pain in the shoulder is a common problem after stroke. As well as causing distress through pain and lost sleep, it prevents rehabilitation of the arm and hand. This study will identify ‘who’, ‘when’ and ‘how’ to treat people with painful shoulders after stroke more effectively, and should lead to better outcomes for them.

Date published
01/08/2017

What does it really mean to have visual and attentional problems after stroke?

University of Oxford
Status
Active
Summary

The findings of this research could help provide stroke survivors and their relatives with more accurate information about what impacts they can expect over time, and will help doctors and therapists identify which patients with visual neglect will benefit the most from new treatments.

Date published
01/05/2018

How can we improve talking about recovery on the stroke unit?

University of Leeds
Status
Active
Summary

Following a stroke, some patients and their relatives describe dissatisfaction with the information they receive about the patient’s outlook for recovery. The outcome of this study should be an intervention for stroke unit staff, which can help them better address the issue.

Date published
01/08/2017

Can we predict how people with aphasia after stroke will respond to speech and language therapy?

University College London
Status
Active
Summary

The recovery of stroke survivors with language difficulties is famously variable. Some stroke survivors recover much more quickly or fully than others. Some respond to treatment much better than others. The aim of the proposed work is to employ similar techniques to PLORAS project to predict which patients are most suited to what speech and language therapy, which could then help them make their best recovery.

Date published
01/08/2017

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