University of Oxford
Status
Active

The findings of this research could help provide stroke survivors and their relatives with more accurate information about what impacts they can expect over time and will help doctors and therapists identify which patients with visual neglect will benefit the most from new treatments.

Published
01/05/2018
University of Oxford
Status
Active

Existing vision tests do not tell us how a patient’s life will be influenced by their vision problems. This project aims to understand how the results of vision tests relate to how stroke survivors will be able to function in their daily lives.

Published
01/03/2018
University of Oxford
Status
Active

People who have survived a previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) are at particularly high risk of subsequent, ‘recurrent’ stroke with 30% having another stroke in the following five years.  High blood pressure is the most important reversible risk factor for having a recurrent stroke. The aim of this study is to develop and test a self-monitoring system of high blood pressure, tailored to the needs of stroke and TIA survivors, which will include self-adjustment of medication where possible in consultation with a GP.

Published
01/01/2018
Royal Holloway, University of London
Status
Active

Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an unusual form of stroke. It is little researched largely because it accounts for less than 1% of all strokes. The study will provide a much better understanding for the reasons underlying CVT, which is an unusual but very important cause of stroke in young (mainly female) adults. It could lead to a better prediction of who will have a CVT, as well as to discovery of specific treatments.

Published
20/11/2016
The Universities of Greenwich and Kent at Medway
Status
Active

Most stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) survivors are asked to take medicines, which some can find difficult. However, taking the medicines prescribed after a stroke, or TIA, and following lifestyle advice can reduce the chance of another stroke by 80%.  Unfortunately, over 25% of stroke survivors do not continue these medicines, even for the first year after their stroke. Another 20% take less than is needed for the medicines to work.

This research will use the views of stroke and TIA survivors to design a life-long medicines support service which could be provided by pharmacists.

Published
15/02/2016
University of Reading
Status
Active

Postgraduate Fellowship: Ms Emma Pilkington (TSA PGF 2015-02)

Published
16/06/2015
University of Oxford
Status
Active

TSA LECT 2015/02 - Dr Nele Demeyere, University of Oxford

Published
19/03/2015
University of Reading
Status
Closed

We are yet to understand the differences between those individuals who do and do not spontaneously recover language comprehension abilities. This research aims to uncover these differences.

Published
03/09/2012
Haslemere & District Community Hospital
Status
Closed

In the proposed study it will be investigated if the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) is suitable for use in stroke survivors aged 65 years and older, who are undergoing inpatient rehabilitation.

Published
21/09/2011

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