Resource type: Information leaflet

transient ischaemic attack or TIA (also known as a mini-stroke) is a major warning sign of a stroke. This guide explains what you can do to reduce your risk of a stroke.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Regularly drinking too much alcohol raises your risk of a stroke, so it's important that you don't regularly drink more than the recommended limit. This guide explains the link between alcohol and stroke and offers some useful tips for cutting down.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Physiotherapy is used to help with movement problems after a stroke, such as weakness or paralysis. This guide explains how physiotherapy can help you learn to
move and get around. It can help you learn to use your arm and hand in everyday activities as much as possible.

Resource type: Information leaflet

This guide explains the link between high blood pressure and stroke, the medication used to treat it and some steps you can take to lower your blood pressure.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Diabetes doubles your risk of a stroke, so it's important that it's treated and controlled well if you have it. This guide explains what diabetes is, the link between diabetes and stroke, and how to make changes to your lifestyle to reduce your risk.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Around 15% of strokes are haemorrhagic (due to bleeding in or around the brain). This guide explains the two different types of stroke caused by a bleed, intracerebral and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and how they are diagnosed and treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet

People with a type of irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation (AF) are five times more likely to have a stroke. This guide explains what AF is diagnosed, how it increases your risk of stroke and how it is treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Around 85% of strokes are due to a blocked blood vessel in the brain, known as an ischaemic stroke. This guide explains what an ischaemic stroke is, what can cause you to have one, and how it is usually diagnosed and treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Most strokes happen because of a blockage in an artery. A common cause of this is disease in the large carotid arteries in the front of your neck. This guide explains what can cause carotid artery disease and how it can be treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Occupational therapy can help you adjust to life after stroke by giving you the confidence and skills to perform daily tasks. This guide explains what to expect from occupational therapy and how you can find a therapist. 

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