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Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Publication
September 2017

This guide gives information about transient ischaemic attack (TIA), what the symptoms are, what to do if you have them and how a TIA is diagnosed and treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Publication
September 2017

Around 15% of strokes are haemorrhagic (due to bleeding in or around the brain). This guide explains the two different types of stroke caused by a bleed, intracerebral and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and how they are diagnosed and treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Publication
September 2017
You can still enjoy a range of hobbies and leisure activities after you've had a stroke. This guide provides some ideas from arts and crafts to days out.
Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Publication
September 2017

This guide explains what private treatments are available for stroke and what to consider before deciding if they are right for you. It covers rehabilitation therapies like physiotherapy, as well as health checks and scans.

Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Publication
September 2017

Physiotherapy is an important part of rehabilitation after a stroke. This guide explains when and where your physiotherapy will take place and what it might involve.

Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Publication
September 2017

People with a type of irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation (AF) are five times more likely to have a stroke. This guide explains what AF is, how it increases your risk of stroke and how it is treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Publication
September 2017

You might be prescribed blood-thinning medication to reduce your risk of a TIA or stroke. This guide describes some of the different types of blood-thinning medication available and why you might be prescribed them.

Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Publication
September 2017

Around 85% of strokes are ischaemic, and happen because of a blockage or 'clot' cutting off the blood supply to part of your brain.This guide explains what an ischaemic stroke is, what can cause you to have one, and how it is usually diagnosed and treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Research
September 2017

High blood pressure is the biggest risk factor for stroke, affecting 5.5 million people in the UK alone. This guide explains the link between high blood pressure and stroke, the medication used to treat it and the steps you can take to lower your blood pressure.

Resource type: Information leaflet
Publication type: Publication
September 2017

For some people, getting back behind the wheel is a main priority after a stroke. This guide has information about how stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) can affect your ability to drive and what you need to do if you want to get back in the drivers seat.

Tags: Driving | Work

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