Resource type: Information leaflet

After a stroke, you might find it harder to perform some daily tasks like cooking and dressing. Fortunately, there are a variety of aids and equipment available to help. This guide has information on some of these products and where you can find them. 

Resource type: Information leaflet

The benefits system can be complicated, but it's important to know what financial assistance you are entitled to as a stroke survivor or carer. This guide aims to help you navigate some of the benefits that might be available to you and how you can claim them. 

Resource type: Information leaflet

For many people, getting back behind the wheel is a big priority after a stroke if you need to drive for work, family life or leisure. This guide has information about how stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) can affect your ability to drive. Plus details of how to inform the DVLA or DVA about your stroke.

Tags: Driving | Work
Resource type: Information leaflet
You can still enjoy a range of hobbies and leisure activities after you've had a stroke. This guide provides some ideas, from arts and crafts to accessible days out.
Resource type: Information leaflet

A stroke can lead to seizures. This can happen soon after the stroke, or up to two years or more later. Having a seizure doesn't mean you will be diagnosed with epilepsy. Find out how epilepsy is diagnosed and treated, and first aid for a seizure. Plus driving after a seizure.

Tags: Driving | Epilepsy
Resource type: Information leaflet

Diabetes doubles your risk of a stroke, so it's important that it's treated and controlled well if you have it. This guide explains what diabetes is, the link between diabetes and stroke, and how to make changes to your lifestyle to reduce your risk.

Resource type: Information leaflet

This guide explains some of the risk factors for stroke that only affect women, and offers other sources of information and support that you may find useful.

Resource type: Information leaflet

People with a type of irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation (AF) are five times more likely to have a stroke. This guide explains what AF is diagnosed, how it increases your risk of stroke and how it is treated.

Resource type: Stroke News magazine

Our cover star, Paul, tells us how humour and storytelling have helped him to come to terms with his stroke. Our Helpline Team also share their advice on finding support if you or a loved one has been diagnosed with vascular dementia.

Resource type: Information guide

Stroke can happen to anyone, including children. The causes of stroke for children are very different from those for adults. This guide explains what can cause stroke in children and how it is treated. 

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