Resource type: Information leaflet

Around 85% of strokes are due to a blocked blood vessel in the brain, known as an ischaemic stroke. This guide explains what an ischaemic stroke is, what can cause you to have one, and how it is usually diagnosed and treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Most strokes happen because of a blockage in an artery. A common cause of this is disease in the large carotid arteries in the front of your neck. This guide explains what can cause carotid artery disease and how it can be treated.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Diabetes doubles your risk of a stroke, so it's important that it's treated and controlled well if you have it. This guide explains what diabetes is, the link between diabetes and stroke, and how to make changes to your lifestyle to reduce your risk.

Resource type: Information leaflet

Getting regular exercise is one of the best things you can do to reduce your risk of a stroke. This guide explains how exercise can improve your health, suggests some activities for you to try, and gives some organisations and resources that can help you find a form of exercise that suits you.

Resource type: Information leaflet

This leaflet explains why what you eat affects your risk of stroke and suggests some simple ways you can make your diet healthier.

Resource type: Information leaflet

This guide provides information about why someone might not survive a stroke, and the emotional impact on family and carers. 

Resource type: Information leaflet

This guide explains some of the risk factors for stroke that only affect women, and offers other sources of information and support that you may find useful.

Resource type: Information leaflet

For many people, getting back behind the wheel is a big priority after a stroke if you need to drive for work, family life or leisure. This guide has information about how stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) can affect your ability to drive. Plus details of how to inform the DVLA or DVA about your stroke.

Tags: Driving | Work
Resource type: Information leaflet

A stroke can lead to seizures. This can happen soon after the stroke, or up to two years or more later. Having a seizure doesn't mean you will be diagnosed with epilepsy. Find out how epilepsy is diagnosed and treated, and first aid for a seizure. Plus driving after a seizure.

Tags: Driving | Epilepsy
Resource type: Information leaflet

After a stroke, you might have to think carefully about choosing the right accommodation for your support and care needs. This guide gives practical advice on choosing and funding good quality housing. 

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