Neuroplasticity: re-wiring the brain
Your brain is amazing! It has the ability to re-wire itself, allowing you to improve skills such as walking, talking and using your affected arm. This process is known as neuroplasticity. Plasticity means your brain's ability to change. It begins after a stroke, and it can continue for years.
Caring for a stroke survivor
When someone close to you has had a stroke, they may need help and support after they return home from hospital. Find out the different ways you can support a stroke survivor, and what help and support is available for carers.
Haemorrhagic stroke
A haemorrhagic stroke is due to bleeding in or around the brain. While less common than strokes that are caused by a blockage, they can be much more serious.
Ischaemic stroke
An ischaemic stroke happens when a blood clot, or other blockage, cuts off the blood supply to your brain. This is the most common type of stroke.
Physiotherapy after a stroke
Physiotherapy can help you get back as much movement as possible after a stroke. It can help you re-learn to use your arms and hands, and regain movement and strength in your legs to improve movement and balance.
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