Take a look at the volunteering opportunities currently available for supporting stroke survivors. Find all the information you need to apply.

We currently offer a range of stroke services and support over 60,000 stroke survivors, carers and families every year.

Befriender

A stroke can leave someone feeling isolated in a number of ways. Befrienders offer personal support across all services to stroke survivors and carers. In doing so, they help to reduce social isolation and build the confidence and self-esteem of the people they support.

As a befriender, you can support people in your local area on a one-to-one basis according to their individual needs. You can spend time socially with stroke survivors and develop a productive friendship for an agreed period. You will help people achieve their personal goals, become more independent and re-integrate with their community.

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Mentor

Mentors offer a particular kind of support to stroke survivors by placing particular emphasis and focus on goal setting, in order to help their recovery following a stroke. In doing so, they help to reduce social isolation and build the confidence and self-esteem of the people they support.

As a mentor, you can support survivors and carers with their recoveries on a one-to-one basis according to their individual needs. This may be as part of a Stroke Association service or to help an individual transition from a service to long-term peer support in the community.

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Peer supporter

Peer Supporters offer a particular kind of befriending support to stroke survivors from their own experience and perspective as a stroke survivor or carer. In doing so, they help to reduce social isolation and build the confidence and self-esteem of the people they support.

As a peer supporter, you can support people on a one-to-one basis according to their individual needs. You will help people to achieve their personal goals and become more independent. 

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Communication Service Supporter

About a third of stroke survivors will experience communication difficulties after their stroke, which can make daily living extremely challenging. Our Communication Service Supporters support stroke survivors to develop new strategies to aid their communication. In doing so, they help people to build their confidence, achieve personal goals and promote independence.

As a Communication Service Supporter, you can provide focused support to facilitate communication in groups, or on a one-to-one basis in a stroke survivor's home, and enable them to access activities and services in their local community.

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Driver

After a stroke, many people will not be able to drive and may find it challenging to access local activities, services and events. As a result, many people lose their independence and can become socially isolated.

Our drivers provide a safe, comfortable transport service to stroke survivors and sometimes their carers and families, as well as baggage and/or equipment. 

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My Stroke Guide Buddy

My Stroke Guide is an online tool designed to help individuals self manage their own condition after a stroke. My Stroke Guide Buddies visit stroke survivors and their carers in a variety of locations and settings and introduce them to this tool.

As a My Stroke Guide Buddy, you will explain the functions in detail and in a clear manner and help people to personalise their accounts.

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Service Group Supporter

As a Service Group Supporter, you will be part of a team assisting in the running of one or more of our service groups.

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