Unviersity of Glasgow
Status
Active

This study will investigate whether early initiation of direct anticoagulant drugs will be as safe as later initiation in stroke patients with an abnormal heart rhythm (atrial fibrillation). It will also investigate whether early initation could lead to fewer recurrent strokes.

Published
25/01/2018
University of Oxford
Status
Active

People who have survived a previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) are at particularly high risk of subsequent, ‘recurrent’ stroke with 30% having another stroke in the following five years.  High blood pressure is the most important reversible risk factor for having a recurrent stroke. The aim of this study is to develop and test a self-monitoring system of high blood pressure, tailored to the needs of stroke and TIA survivors, which will include self-adjustment of medication where possible in consultation with a GP.

Published
01/01/2018
University of Edinburgh
Status
Active

The aim of this research programme is to develop a human brain bank to support biomedical research into the pathophysiology of human SVD that may be used nationally and internationally. 

Published
01/12/2017
University of Manchester
Status
Active

Inflammation is an important defence mechanism that the body uses in response to injury or infection. However, it can also be highly damaging to the brain directly after stroke. This study will investigate whether adult stem cells can be transformed and used to reduce inflammation in the brain after stroke, and promote recovey.

Published
01/09/2017
University College London
Status
Active

The recovery of stroke survivors with language difficulties is famously variable. Some stroke survivors recover much more quickly or fully than others. Some respond to treatment much better than others. The aim of the proposed work is to employ similar techniques to PLORAS project to predict which patients are most suited to what speech and language therapy, which could then help them make their best recovery.

Published
01/08/2017
University of Edinburgh
Status
Active

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans provide lots of data on the health of a person’s brain, not all of which is routinely used in clinical practice. This project will continue the development of tools to assess the brain scans of people with stroke. The outcome of this research should produce methods that can predict how patients will fare after a stroke, helping doctors to decide the best treatments and improve outcomes. 

 

Published
01/08/2017
University of Glasgow
Status
Active

Following a stroke, many treatments are recommended by health professionals, such as medications to prevent another stroke or physiotherapy to help limb weakness. Stroke survivors often have other chronic illnesses and report finding it difficult to follow treatments recommended by their doctors, nurses and therapists. This project aims to develop a way of measuring the workload and potential difficulties encountered by those who have had a stroke when managing their health problems, and aims to develop and test possible solutions.

Published
23/05/2017
Newcastle University
Status
Active

About 80% strokes are caused by a blocked blood vessel. One third of these patients have a blockage of a large blood vessel in the neck or brain known as large artery occlusion stroke (LAOS). The aim of this programme is to develop and test a new care pathway for paramedics to recognise those patients who are likely to have a large artery blockage, so that this group can be taken directly to the thrombectomy hospital.

Published
23/05/2017
University of Manchester
Status
Active

Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is a type of stroke, which is caused by bleeding in the brain, ultimately leading to brain damage, disability and often death. We currently know very little about the biological changes that occur in the brain after intracerebral haemorrhage. This research on ICH will use zebrafish models so that we can gain a much better understanding of how cells of the brain respond to the bleeding and if there are ways that we can stop the damage caused.

Published
23/05/2017
University of Edinburgh
Status

A collaboration of experts in stroke and vascular dementia has worked with people affected by both diseases to create a program of work that answers fundamental questions: who will develop memory and thinking problems after stroke, why does this happen, how can we treat it?

Published
20/05/2017

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