How do emotion, thinking and memory change following a stroke?
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Problems of mood, thinking and memory are common after a stroke. There has been limited research around these issues. This work aims to answer fundamental questions around who develops these problems and how they recover.
Understanding the emotional, thinking and memory problems that can follow a stroke
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Stroke survivors and healthcare professionals have identified psychological and cognitive (thinking and mood) problems after stroke as someof the most important areas where more research is needed. This Lectureship will investigate how common these issues are after stroke, how they change over time, and how these changes can be predicted.
Exploring the long-term effects of cognitive changes
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Professor Nele Demeyere shares the findings of her research into how stroke affects mood and thinking in the long term.
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Understanding the nature and impact of long term psychological changes (thinking, mood and fatigue) after stroke
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This research aims to find out more about how thinking and mood are affected long-term after stroke, and the impact it has on people’s lives.
Building the field of research to support people coping with psychological difficulties after stroke
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Stroke survivors and healthcare professionals have identified problems with thinking and mood after stroke as some of the most important issues faced after a stroke. This Lectureship aims to test treatments to help stroke survivors with their cognitive (thinking) difficulties.
Adjustment post-stroke and aphasia: supporting well-being through peer befriending
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This project aims to find out if peer support can avert some of the adverse psychological consequences of aphasia.
Emotional changes
This page explains how a stroke can affect the way you feel, some of the emotional problems that can happen because of it and some of the things that can help to treat them.
Fatigue after childhood stroke
With support and understanding, a child can learn ways to manage their fatigue after childhood stroke to lead an active life.
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Transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
A transient ischaemic attack, TIA, or mini-stroke, is the same as a stroke, but the symptoms last a short time. A TIA is a warning that you are at risk of having a stroke.
Delivering group support for people with aphasia through Eva Park
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About one-third of stroke survivors are left with aphasia. This is a language disorder that disrupts the production and comprehension of speech, as well as reading and writing. This study will investigate whether a support group intervention can be delivered remotely to people with aphasia through a virtual island platform called Eva Park.